Window and Glass Security Tips

Glass SecurityIs every window in your home secure? Do you have windows in your garage or basement? Are those secure, too? If a burglar were to open or break the glass on any window or door at your house, how soon would this be brought to your attention?

Thinking about your home right now, it is important to be honest with yourself in terms of what is needed in order to keep criminals out. It is not unusual for a homeowner to want to ignore potentially weak areas of security for lack of time or to avoid the presumably high cost of new home security. Neither of these is a valid excuse, however, since DIY home security allows homeowners to fortify a home according to their own schedule (often in a matter of hours) and at prices far less than a home security company would charge for equipment, installation and monitoring.

When installing a new security system, special attention should be paid to all windows and glass doors in a home. It is not enough to merely rely on factory window locks to keep an intruder out. Instead, homeowners should take a multi-layered approach to window security by installing specialized locks, window sensors and glass break detectors.

Install New Locks On Every Window

Most factory window locks are not enough to keep a burglar out. While companies that manufacture windows produce them with built-in locks, these devices are not exactly created with the highest levels of security in mind. Also, with enough such windows on the market, burglars have plenty of opportunities to learn how these locks work and, more importantly, how to unlock them. In most cases, the latter does not take much effort as these locks tend to give way with a little extra force or manipulation.

Window Locks and Ventilation

With this in mind, homeowners should stop all reliance on a manufacturer’s window locks and, instead, install new locks on every window in a home. Sliding glass doors should also be fitted with special security locks. For those with concerns about summer heat and who may prefer extra ventilation at times, security locks will allow for such where a manufacturer’s locks generally won’t (or may offer flimsy security when then do). One such security device that we recommend for this purpose is the Lock-it Block-it Home Home Security Burglar Bar for Windows found in our main store. Made of PVC and ABS plastic, this durable but adjustable bar requires no installation and offers a high level security to those who would like to ventilate a room while still presenting a strong barrier against outside intrusion.

Children, Teenagers and Solid Window Security

Beyond keeping burglars out, proper window and glass security also keeps children safe. We’ve all shuddered in horror at news reports of children falling from windows which were not properly secured. Home security window burglar bars and other window locks help in significantly reducing the likelihood of a window being left open wide enough for a child to fit through or even of a young child being able to manipulate a lock on her own in order to open a window.

Window sensors also provide greater security for homes with mischievous teenagers. Once an alarm is armed, parents can sleep peacefully knowing that a teen cannot sneak out of a home at night. Should a teen even attempt to do so, an alert or a full alarm is sounded the moment that a window is opened.

Glass Break Sensors

Whether a home is equipped with casement windows or sliding windows, at least one window in each room should be fitted with a glass break sensor. Additionally, glass window boxes and decorative glass on doors or around a doorway should also be equipped with glass break detectors. Doing so ensures that an alarm is triggered the moment that glass is broken in a home. For the best protection with glass break sensors, shop for one with dual technology so that it can detect breaking glass beyond the window where it is mounted. For example, this one has a 15 foot detection radius, which means that beyond the window it is mounted on, it can detect breaking glass from nearby windows up to a range of 15 ft.

Garage and Basement Glass

Smaller windows in garages, attics and basements are sometimes ignored due to a perception that some are too small for an intruder to climb through or because they have been sealed shut and a homeowner believes that they cannot be pried open. Ignoring these spaces is a serious security breach, however, since intruders are willing to use children, smash glass or use any number of tools to pry these windows open. Do not cut corners by leaving a single window or glass door in any of these areas unprotected.

Your Tips Are Needed

If your home has ever been broken into via a window or a glass door, sharing your experience may teach us all a thing or two. What are your best tips for window and glass security? Help spread the word by leaving your thoughts in the comments section now.

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